Simplified Proxmox VE 8 Installation on Debian 12 Bookworm

Proxmox VE is a comprehensive, open-source server management platform that seamlessly integrates KVM hypervisor and LXC containers. Today, we present a streamlined process for installing Proxmox VE 8 on Debian 12 Bookworm, based on the official guidance from the Proxmox VE Installation Guide.


Prerequisites

  • A fresh Debian 12 Bookworm installation.
  • A user with sudo privileges.
  • Internet connectivity.

Installation Scripts

We’ve divided the installation into two scripts. The first script prepares your system and installs the Proxmox VE kernel. The second script continues the process after a system reboot, installing the remaining Proxmox VE packages.

Remember, all these commands need to be executed from the root user level, so:

First Part: System Preparation and Kernel Installation

Start by downloading the first script which prepares your system and installs the Proxmox VE kernel:

Run the script with the following command:

Here is the content of the script:

After running the first script, your system will reboot. At this stage, you may encounter a few dialogs from the system, which are part of the normal package configuration steps. For this simplified installation, you can accept the default options by pressing Enter.

Screenshots during Installation

The selection of GRUB installation configuration.

GRUB Configuration – A new version of the GRUB bootloader configuration file is available. It’s recommended to keep the local version currently installed unless you are aware of the changes. As with the previous dialogs, pressing Enter will select the default action.

The selection of postfix installation configuration.

Postfix Configuration – This dialog appears when installing the postfix package, which is a mail transport agent. The default option “Internet Site” is suitable for most cases. Pressing Enter accepts this configuration.

Setting the system mail name.

System Mail Name – Here you specify the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) for the system mail. The default value is usually adequate unless you have a specific domain name for your server. Again, pressing Enter will continue with the default configuration.

There might be issues encountered towards the end of the first script installation, such as:

However, the second part of the script, executed after the reboot, addresses these problems.
After a successful reboot of the machine, log into the system and proceed to the second script.

Second Part: Completing Proxmox VE Installation

After your system has rebooted, proceed with downloading the second script:

Execute the second part of the installation with the command:

This is the content of the second script:

Once the second script completes, you will be able to access the Proxmox VE web interface using the URL displayed at the script’s conclusion. Log in with the ‘root’ username and your root password.

Upon loading the page, you may encounter a certificate trust error – this is normal at this stage, and you can safely accept that it is unsafe and proceed to access the page for managing Proxmox. If you don’t know the root password, you can reset it by executing ‘passwd‘ as root. Good luck!

Proxy through nginx frontend to the second virtual server wordpress

In a situation where we have one public IP address and we have many domains directed to that IP address, it is worth considering spreading the traffic to other servers. Proxmox, which allows you to create a pair of virtual machines, is perfect in such a situation. In my case, each virtual machine is separated and the traffic is broken down by nginx, which distributes the traffic to other servers. The virtual machine on my website will redirect traffic, I have the IP address for wordpress: 10.10.11.105 on port 80. In this case, no encryption is required, but the frontend itself, which manages the traffic, will present itself with encryption and security on port 443.

Two machines with the following configuration will participate throughout the process:
up-page IP: 10.10.14.200
soban-pl IP: 10.10.11.105

So let’s move on to the frontend that distributes traffic to other machines.
The frontend is done by linux debian 11 (bullseye), in addition, I have the following entry in the repository (/etc/apt/sources.list):

To install nginx, run the following commands:

You should make sure that the traffic from the frontend has the appropriate port 80 transitions. You can read how to check the network transitions here: Check network connection and open TCP port via netcat.

Screenshot of a terminal window showing a successful telnet connection to the IP address 10.10.11.105 on port 80, followed by the user exiting the telnet session with the 'quit' command.

The configuration of the frontend that distributes the traffic is as follows (/etc/nginx/conf.d/soban.pl.ssl.conf):

Configuration of the above-mentioned wordpress, additional authorization is also set when you try to log in to wp-admin, you can read about it here: More security wp-admin in nginx.

In the next step, check if the nginx configuration is correct by:

Terminal output displaying a successful nginx configuration test with the messages: 'nginx: the configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf syntax is ok' and 'nginx: configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf test is successful'.

If everything is fine, restart nginx:

In a virtual machine with nginx it should also be installed. This is the same as debian linux 11 (bullseye), so the respository should look like this:

Just installing nginx looks the same as on a machine that acts as a proxy.

All configuration is in /etc/nginx/conf.d/soban.pl.conf:

Also in this case, check the correctness of the nginx service configuration:

Everything looks fine, so let’s move on to restarting the service:

If the whole configuration was done correctly, the page should be directed without encrypted traffic to the virtual machine with wordpress. A wordpress service with nginx is not the only one that can be hosted or proxied. We can direct traffic from nginx to e.g. jboss, apacha and all other web services. Of course, this requires a corresponding modification of the configuration presented above, but the general outline of the concept as an nginx proxy has been presented. You should also remember about the appropriate configuration of keys and certificates. In my case let’s encrypt works perfectly for this.

Improving encryption on old red hat 5 by new Oracle Linux 7 using apache mod_proxy

There are situations when we need to increase the encryption level on the old system – according to the PCI audit requirements. However, the old system is no longer supported, so updating the encryption level is not possible. This is not a recommended solution, because we should try to transfer the application to a new system. After all, when we have little time, it is possible to hide the old version of the system and allow only the new machine to move to it. In this particular example, we will use mod_proxy as a proxy to redirect traffic to the old machine, while using iptables we will only allow communication with the new machine. It is not a recommended solution, but it works and I would like to present it here. The systems that I will be basing on in this example are the old red hat 5 and the new oracle linux 7. Recently, it has become very important to use a minimum of tls 1.2 and none below for banking transactions. Let’s start with the proxy server configuration oracle linux 7.

As of this writing, the addressing is as follows:
new_machine IP: 10.10.14.100
old_machine IP: 10.10.14.101
Traffic will be routed on port 443 from new_machine to old_machine.

Before we go to proxy configuration, please make sure there are network transitions from new_machine (10.10.14.100) to old_machine (10.10.14.101) to port 443. You can read how to verify network connections here: check network connection and open tcp port via netcat.

We go to the installation of apache and mod_proxy:

After installing apache, go to the edition:

Below are the news on the check level, what are the updates, and ip on the next service update:

In order to verify the correctness of apache configuration, you can issue a command that will check it:

If the apache configuration is correct, we can proceed to reloading apache:

At this point, we have a configured proxy connection. Before we move on to limiting traffic with iptables, I suggest you go to the site – with the new mod_proxy configured and test if everything is working properly and if there are any problems with the application.

Once everything is working fine, the network transitions are there, we can go to the iptables configuration for red hat 5. Let’s start by checking the system version:

Now we are going to prepare iptables so that the network traffic is available on port 443 from the new_machine (10.10.14.100). To do this, edit the file /etc/sysconfig/iptables:

After iptables settings are correct, we can reload the service:

In this way, we managed to cover up the weak encryption by proxying and diverting traffic to the new machine. This is not a recommended solution and you should try to transfer the application to a new environment compatible with the new system. However, in crisis situations, we can use this solution. Network traffic is not allowed by other IP addresses, so scanners will not be able to detect weak encryption on the old machine, and users using the old environment will not be able to use it. This does not change the fact that weak encryption is still set in the old environment and needs to be corrected. The example I gave is for the old red hat 5 and the new oracle linux 7, but it can be assumed that a similar solution and configuration is possible for other versions of the system.

Increasing the security of the ssh service

Nowadays, many bots or hackers look for port 22 on servers and try to log in. Usually, the login attempt is made as the standard linuxe root user. In this short article, I will describe how to create a user that will be able to log in as root and change the default ssh port 22 to 2222. Let’s go:

This way we created the user ‘soban’ and assigned it the default shell ‘/bin/bash’.

We still need to set a password for the user ‘soban’:

In the next step, let’s add it to ‘/etc/sudoers’ so that it can become root. Keep in mind that once the user can get root, he will be able to do anything on the machine!

Please add this entry below:

How can we test whether the user has the ability to log in as root? Nothing easier, first we’ll switch to the user we just created:

To list the possible sudo commands, just type the command:

Finally, to confirm whether it is possible to log in as root, you should issue the command:

Now that we have a root user ready, let’s try disabling ssh logon directly and change the default port. To do this, go to the default configuration of the ssh service, which is located in ‘/etc/ssh/sshd_config’:

We are looking for a line containing ‘Port’ – it can be hashed, so it should be unhashed and ‘PermitRootLogin’. Then set them as below:

In this way, we changed the default port 22 to 2222 and disallowed the possibility of logging in directly to the root user. However, the ssh service still needs to be reloaded, in debian or kali linux we do it like this:

In this way, we have managed to create a user who can safely log into the ssh service and become root. In addition, after changing the port, we will not go out on port 22 scans, which by default is set and scanned by a potential burglar. Installing the fail2ban service is also a very good improvement in security.

iftop as a good network traffic monitoring tool

iftop is a command-line tool used for real-time network bandwidth monitoring. It displays a continuously updated list of network connections and the amount of data transferred between them. The connections are listed in a table format and are sorted by either the amount of data transferred or the total number of packets sent or received.

iftop provides a variety of filtering options, allowing you to limit the display to specific hosts, networks, or ports. It also provides support for IPv6, and it can display information about the source and destination IP addresses, port numbers, and protocols.

iftop is particularly useful for monitoring network traffic in real-time and identifying which applications or services are consuming the most bandwidth. It can also help identify network performance issues and can assist in troubleshooting network problems.

Overall, iftop is a powerful and flexible tool for network monitoring and analysis, and it can be a valuable addition to any network administrator’s toolkit.

One of the more useful network traffic monitoring tools I find is iftop. It is especially useful when the link’s throat is flooded. In my experience, it is easy to use it to catch all kinds of network attacks, especially DoS. In the example given below, I will send a larger file to the remote machine and limit its upload speed, in the meantime I will observe the traffic with the iftop tool. Let’s start by installing iftop on the local machine. In this case it is kali linux: 

The distribution doesn’t matter in this case, just like it installs on any other operating system, it may well be linux debian.

We will do the same on the remote machine, so let’s move on to installing iftop on linux debian:

To start monitoring network traffic, run iftop with parameters: ‘-PpNn’:

As I am ssh connected to the remote machine, I can see my network connection.

Now let’s go back to the local machine, create a large file:

Once we have created a 1GB file, let’s try to send it with a transfer limit to the remote machine:

In this case, I used scp with the limit of 800 to send the file. To calculate how many KB/sec this is, divide by 8. From a simple calculation it follows that 800/8 = 100. To see scp and how to send files I encourage you to read: Securely Copy Files (scp) tool to copying files by ssh.

When sending the file, the traffic on the local machine looked like this (outgoing traffic):

At the same time, it looked like this on the remote machine (incoming traffic):

As you can see, in this way you can catch both outgoing and incoming traffic. The iftop tool has more parameters, I encourage you to read the manual. It is a simple tool, however, thanks to it, we can easily observe live network traffic. In the case of bruteforce, a significant number of connections will be made, but in the case of a DoS attack, the attacker will try to saturate the bandwidth, therefore the incoming traffic on the machine will be large. There are situations when the machine is naturally overloaded with the network, then you should limit the connection speed, in this case iptables works perfectly.

Securely Copy Files (scp) tool to copying files by ssh

A very good tool for securely copying files via the ssh protocol between machines is scp. It allows you to transfer files to the target machine as well as download from a given source. The tool is usually built into the system so it works on many distributions. Below I will present how you can send and download files. For correct file transfer, running ssh service is required, because it is the basis of scp operation. Of course, when using the tool, you can specify the port as the parameter, provided that it has been changed. The standard port used by the ssh daemon is 22. 

In Linux, scp (Secure Copy) is a command-line utility used for securely transferring files between local and remote systems. It is a secure alternative to cp, which is not secure when transferring files over a network.

The scp command is commonly used for copying files to or from a remote server. It uses the SSH protocol to securely transfer files and provides the same level of security as SSH. The syntax of the scp command is as follows:

Here, [source] is the file or directory you want to copy, and [destination] is the location where you want to copy the file or directory.

Some common options used with the scp command are:

  • -r: Copies directories recursively
  • -P: Specifies the port number to use for the SSH connection
  • -i: Specifies the path to the identity file used for authentication

For example, to copy a file named file.txt from a remote server to the local machine, you would use the following command:

This command will copy the file from the remote server to the local machine at the specified directory.

Similarly, to copy a directory named dir from the local machine to a remote server, you would use the following command:

This command will copy the directory and its contents from the local machine to the remote server at the specified directory.

Let’s start by creating an example file that we will transfer: 

in the next step, let’s move on to uploading the file. In my case, the port from ssh has been changed to 2222:

The first time you connect, you will be asked for a fingerprint. 
As you can see, the file has been sent correctly. 

Instead of the sign at the end of ‘~‘ we can specify where the target file should be placed (/tmp/example-path): 

There are many combinations, you can send, for example, all files containing the ending (*.tar.gz) to the user’s home directory, which is just symbolized by ‘~‘: 

An interesting parameter is the ‘-r‘ in scp where we can transfer entire folders, example using copying a folder from local machine to remote machine: 

OK, after the file has been successfully sent to the target machine, let’s delete the local file we created above and try to download it back: 

Next, let’s move on to downloading the file from the remote server to the local machine: 

Above I gave an example of how to send an entire folder from a local machine to a remote machine. The other way around, of course, we can also do it. To download a remote folder to a local machine, use the ‘-r‘ parameter:

The scp utility has more parameters, you can get them by reading the man page: 

It is worth paying attention to the ‘-l‘ parameter where we can set the limit of transferred files. This is useful when transferring larger files so as not to overload your connection. 

If you are tired of constantly entering your password, I encourage you to read how you can connect to ssh without providing a password. Then copying files using scp will become more: generate ssh key pair in linux.

In my opinion, scp is good for transferring files quickly one time. However, as often you exchange files between machines a more convenient way is to use sshfs as described here: sshfs great tool to mount remote file system.

sshfs great tool to mount remote file system

SSHFS (SSH File System) is a secure file transfer system that enables users to remotely access and manage files on a remote server over an encrypted SSH (Secure Shell) connection. SSHFS uses the SSH protocol to establish a secure connection between the local and remote systems, which enables users to securely transfer files between the two systems.

To use SSHFS, the user needs to have SSHFS installed on their local system as well as the remote system that they want to connect to. Once SSHFS is installed, the user can mount the remote system as a local directory on their system, and access the remote files as if they were stored locally.

SSHFS provides a secure and convenient way to access and manage files on remote systems, without the need for additional software or complicated configuration. It also enables users to access files on remote systems using standard file operations, such as copying, moving, and deleting, making it a simple and effective way to manage files on remote systems.

SSH Filesystem (sshfs) is a very useful tool for remotely transferring files over the ssh protocol. An additional advantage of the whole is encryption. This is a convenient way to mount a remote folder to delete files. Below I will try to briefly introduce how to install sshfs and how to mount the folder remotely. Additionally, we will make an entry in /etc/fstab at the end, so that the resource itself is mounted after restarting the system. Let’s move on to installing the tool itself:

In this case, as you can see, the installation was done on kali linuxe, however the procedure is the same on debian.

Let’s move on to the file mounting itself, at this point I will point out that the default port is 22. In my case, however, the port has been changed to 2222. For services such as ssh, I try to change the default ports so as not to get caught by bots and not end up in the database such as shodan.io. The command itself in this case is very simple, but first we need to create a folder:

Let’s try to mount a remote folder:

During mounting, we will be asked if the fingerprint is correct. Then for the system password. The command itself can be disassembled into ‘soban‘ – this is the username. Then ‘soban.pl‘ is the domain name, you can also put the IP address here. The next ‘/home/soban‘ element is the folder that will be mounted. And after the space ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ we give the folder where the remote folder should be mounted. If everything went as planned, we can list ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ and it should list the contents of the remotely mounted folder ‘/home/soban‘. Let’s list the contents of the ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ folder:

Let’s create a remote file:

Now let’s unmount the remote folder and try listing it again:

As expected, the folder is empty and the file we created was created on a remotely mounted drive. After unmounting as you can see the file ‘/home/kali/myremotedir/example‘.

The next step is to create a private key to mount the folder without entering a password. It is very important not to send nikmou your private key. How we can generate and add a public key to a remote server can be read here: “Generate SSH key pair in Linux“.

Now we will try to add an entry to /etc/fstab which will allow automatic mounting on startup of the remote folder system.
To do this, edit the /etc/fstab entry and add this entry:

It is important that all data is correct, in order to verify the parameters, you can use the command for this ‘id‘:

Now we can move on to mounting the resource:

When mounting for the first time, we may be asked to accept and confirm that the fingerprint is correct. After verifying the correctness of mounting the remote resource, we can restart the system. One note here, the system may get up longer.

Generate SSH key pair in Linux

A very convenient way to log into remote systems via ssh is without the use of passwords. Here it is very important not to share your private key with anyone. Currently, when trying to connect, I am asked for the password to the server:

During the connection, we will be asked if the fingerprint is correct. Then enter the user password that is set on the remote server. During the ssh command ‘soban@soban.pl -p2222‘ I gave the username ‘soban‘ then the domain ‘soban.pl‘ and ‘-p2222‘ port ‘2222’. The default port after ssh is 22, but in this case I changed it so that it does not come out on scans – this increases security as often bots / hackers look for port 22, which is the default ssh port set.

Let’s move on to generating the key and copying it to the server:

This is how the key generation looks like, I hit enter for each question:

As a result, a private key was generated: (/home/kali/.ssh/id_rsa) and a public key (/home/kali/.ssh/id_rsa) that we will place on the remote server:

The last time we log in to the server by entering the password. When logging in, we will not be asked for a password now. This way we are able to add our public key (.ssh / authorized_keys) to the remote server.

More security wp-admin in nginx

Some time ago I noticed that my wordpress hacks are being hacked by logging into the backend of the website. A bot or a hacker is trying to do this using a set of passwords. I decided to secure the website’s backend by requiring additional authentication. In nginxe we can set this up by:

We still need to provide the username for authorization and save to the file (/etc/nginx/.htpasswd) as we entered in the nginx configuration file. In “my_user_name”, replace the login of the user with which we will be authorized.:

And the encrypted password has been set by openssl:

Openssl will ask you to come up with a password and enter it twice:

As a result, we will get a file with an encrypted password:

Before reloading nginx, we do a configuration verification:

If everything is set correctly, we should receive the following message:

Now we can restart the service nginx:

The final verification will be to log in to the backend (e.g. www.example-page-wordpress.pl/wp-admin/), as a result, we should be asked for the login and password that we created above:

This is a simple trick to protect your wordpress from bot attacks. However, it should be remembered that we do not share passwords with anyone and setting default usernames and simple passwords is asking for a problem.

Useful tricks to view and search logs

It often happens that we have to catch a given message, e.g. “error” while browsing the logs. Alternatively, we look for the occurrence of a given phrase in the old files. Both “tail” and “grep” are very useful for this. Especially if the logs are set in verbal mode, where there is a lot of messages in the log. We can also exclude certain phrases after parsing the information set. It is enough to use grep properly.

Let’s start by looking at all nginx logs.

In this case, sorting from oldest to newest is very useful as we know where to find the newest log entries:

If we are interested in the latest data, we will focus on the access-soban.pl.log file.

I know that my website is monitored by uptimerobot.com and I would like to find out, for example, from what IP address the website gets a query, e.g. to add it to the firewall as trusted:

As you can see, in this case, the bot that is querying the server has the IP address: 208.115.191.21. If I wanted to see all calls from this IP address, I could view them this way:

If I press (shift + g) I’ll go to the bottom of the log:

It is worth noting that in this case the file in which the query is located is also given.

Now suppose I would like the logs, but without the “uptimerobot“:

This way all queries containing the word “uptimerobots” were cut. We can of course diminish the output from the console more by adding “| grep -v” possibly. Let’s cut out “sitemap“:

One handy thing is to direct the stream from the console output to a file. We do this as follows “/tmp/file.log“:

Additionally, we can pack the file:

After packing the file, we can send it to another person. Sensitive data, such as inquiries or logins, can be cut using grep, as we did above.

Now let’s move on to one of the most useful tools for watching live what happens when someone enters a page:

At this point it is worth noting that we “caught” the logs from the files: “access-soban.pl.log” and “error-soban.pl.log”. However, the “error-soban.pl.log” log is empty, so its content is not shown below. However, if something came up, we would see the contents of the updated file on the console.

Useful at this point is to combine grep and tail. We’re assuming we don’t want uptimerobots to bump into our consoles while observing the logs, so we’re going to cut them like this:

The given examples can be modified in any way. I encourage you to use it in various combinations of tail and grep, especially in situations where erros/warning are repeated. Of course, not only in nginx logs you can use these commands. In all logs where we operate on text, be it system or application. Passing the text mentioned above is very helpful.