sshfs great tool to mount remote file system

SSH Filesystem (sshfs) is a very useful tool for remotely transferring files over the ssh protocol. An additional advantage of the whole is encryption. This is a convenient way to mount a remote folder to delete files. Below I will try to briefly introduce how to install sshfs and how to mount the folder remotely. Additionally, we will make an entry in /etc/fstab at the end, so that the resource itself is mounted after restarting the system. Let’s move on to installing the tool itself:

In this case, as you can see, the installation was done on kali linuxe, however the procedure is the same on debian.

Let’s move on to the file mounting itself, at this point I will point out that the default port is 22. In my case, however, the port has been changed to 2222. For services such as ssh, I try to change the default ports so as not to get caught by bots and not end up in the database such as shodan.io. The command itself in this case is very simple, but first we need to create a folder:

Let’s try to mount a remote folder:

During mounting, we will be asked if the fingerprint is correct. Then for the system password. The command itself can be disassembled into ‘soban‘ – this is the username. Then ‘soban.pl‘ is the domain name, you can also put the IP address here. The next ‘/home/soban‘ element is the folder that will be mounted. And after the space ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ we give the folder where the remote folder should be mounted. If everything went as planned, we can list ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ and it should list the contents of the remotely mounted folder ‘/home/soban‘. Let’s list the contents of the ‘/home/kali/myremotedir‘ folder:

Let’s create a remote file:

Now let’s unmount the remote folder and try listing it again:

As expected, the folder is empty and the file we created was created on a remotely mounted drive. After unmounting as you can see the file ‘/home/kali/myremotedir/example‘.

The next step is to create a private key to mount the folder without entering a password. It is very important not to send nikmou your private key. How we can generate and add a public key to a remote server can be read here: “Generate SSH key pair in Linux“.

Now we will try to add an entry to /etc/fstab which will allow automatic mounting on startup of the remote folder system.
To do this, edit the /etc/fstab entry and add this entry:

It is important that all data is correct, in order to verify the parameters, you can use the command for this ‘id‘:

Now we can move on to mounting the resource:

When mounting for the first time, we may be asked to accept and confirm that the fingerprint is correct. After verifying the correctness of mounting the remote resource, we can restart the system. One note here, the system may get up longer.